Posts Tagged ‘ Debt Ceiling

That Crazy Right Wing

My father just emailed me about the debt-ceiling agreement and I wrote back about some of the feelings I’ve had today. Since I went on a bit, I thought I would put my thoughts up here:

My rep voted no, but it’s hard to avoid feeling like this was theater. The Republicans and Democrats each let enough members of their caucus off the hook that they could cast a phony protest vote when the outcome was not in doubt. Republicans should have been forced to get a majority from their own caucus, so the Tea Party couldn’t indulge in any fiction about this deal not being what they want. And if they really were so extreme they couldn’t pass it by themselves, that should have been Obama’s cue to say, “I can’t reason with these people,” and go the 14th Amendment route.

I have been discussing this online and reading reactions and I have reached the conclusion everyone, but particularly liberals, puts far too much emphasis on what people say and not enough on what they do. All last night I was hearing that this deal was better than a default, and the Democrats had no choice but to bargain with the hostage-takers. I could not disagree more.

The current GOP, like North Korea, derives much of its bargaining power from the belief that it is crazy enough to do anything, regardless of the cost to themselves or the country. From the rhetoric and symbolic maneuvers, yes, they do indeed seem crazy.

But deeds and outcomes tell the real story. The Republican Party has pushed the country to the brink repeatedly, and each time it extracts positive outcomes. It profits by its extremism so consistently that any argument that their actions are irrational is false on its face.

Note that the TARP went through under a Republican president with Republican votes in the House and Senate. Oh, they hate bailouts, but they only drew a line in the sand after the banks had received their money. When it came to mortgage relief or financial reform, they turned into radical anti-government insurrectionists.

They threated a budget shutdown in December, and walked away with the Bush tax cuts extended and major budget cuts. Then they say they are ready to see the country default, and get another massive round of cuts, and a commission that they already vow will not be permitted to mandate tax increases.

I believe someone is crazy when they do harm to themselves and their loved ones. Perhaps Tea Party foot-soldiers do burn with fanatical zeal. But as a movement, they have never known defeat. This does not happen by accident. It is a product of cold calculation, and they will continue making those calculations until the Democrats force them to either see their rhetoric through or acknowledge they have limits.

But we don’t have Democrats like that. Perhaps Pelosi. Certainly not our president.

Last Call for Debt Increases

It looks like we may have a debt-deal. It is a bad one in every respect.

I have neither the time nor inclination to begin cataloging the ways in which Barack Obama has been a disappointment. With civil liberties, global strategy, and the economy he has proven beyond doubt that his judgment is unreliable and his motives dubious. Now he seems intent on co-opting the GOP’s extreme agenda. I don’t know why. Perhaps his centrism is such that he is desperate to find any middle-ground, even if it lies only between Madness and Lunacy.

The debt-deal will require House and Senate Democrats to vote for it. This is what I wrote my congressman:

I am writing to express my extreme displeasure with the debt-ceiling agreement President Obama appears to have struck with the GOP leadership in the House and Senate. It is now clear that we are still in a recession, there was never a significant recovery, and all economic reason dictates that this is a time for the government to stimulate the economy through spending. Compassion dictates this is a time to extend the social safety net, with aid to the long-term unemployed and homeowners struggling with their mortgages (those few who have not already suffered foreclosure). Yet at such a time, President Obama is agreeing to slash entitlements, with the guarantee of more cuts down the road, all in exchange for the absolutely routine and unremarkable act of increasing the debt-limit. The reason, we are told, is because the House Republicans will refuse to raise the debt-ceiling, and therefore deal a body blow to the country’s credit and the economy as a whole.

Congressman, this situation is intolerable. What’s most galling is that this agreement will require the complicity of Democrats like yourself. Speaker Boehner cannot deliver enough GOP votes to pass this odious bargain. Are Democrats, currently in control of the Senate and White House, really going to vote in favor of wrong-headed economic policy and cruelty to the millions of Americans who need jobs and welfare? How will you ever ask for our votes again if you not only fail to prevent this agreement, but actually guarantee its success?

I know the stakes are dire. I know your Republican colleagues are recklessly intransigent and indifferent to the health of the economy under a Democratic administration. I know the grim consequences that would follow failure to increase the debt-ceiling. But Congressman, our failure to take a hard line with GOP extremism has led us to this juncture. It is time to answer the question: do we still have a functioning, two-party democracy, or has GOP extremism finally broken the machinery of government? If the former, then Democratic resistance to this agreement will lead to a better one, perhaps to the clean debt-ceiling increase we should have had all along. If the latter, if the GOP is really willing to harm the entire country in order to advance their agenda of irresponsible tax cuts, then supporting the President as he surrenders Democratic principles only postpones the day of reckoning. It guarantees more pain and suffering along the way, and makes the Democratic Party their agents.

I have learned to expect very little from the President when it comes to fighting for liberal values. I hope that courage and principles still exist among the Democrats of Congress. I hope you and your colleagues will listen to conscience and reason when this deal is presented to you, and vote no.

I will remember this next November, and every primary.